Jama Masjid

Jama Masjid

Built in  Bijapur during the reign of Ali Adil Shah, the Jami Masjid at Bijapur clearly shows the connection with the Bahmani style of the previous century,  it was built to celebrate his victory in the Battle of Talikota.
It is spread over an area of about 10,810 sq m and has beautiful arches, a fine dome and a large inner courtyard. The structure was never completed, as it lacks the two minarets which were supposed to flank the exterior of its eastern entrance, the whole part being left unfinished.  It has been counted as one of the first mosques in India and holds a copy of the Quran written in gold. Moreover, this is the largest masjid in the region and dates back to the period of Adil Shah.
Apart from this, around 2,250 black squares have been erected on the polished floor, for the worshippers. An entrance gateway was added later by the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb. Other features such as the ornamental merlons above the parapet of the courtyard are also missing.
The exterior has been treated by introducing two storeys of arcades recessed into the wall,  the lower one being ornamental while the upper one is open and discloses an arched corridor running  across the entire back and sides of the exterior. The courtyard is a square of 155′ side, contained on three sides by seven arches on each side.  On the west, this arcade shows a central opening emphasized by foliations, forming the facade of the sanctuary.

A wide and deep cornice supported on brackets projects above this arcade. Above the middle of the sanctuary the arcaded square clerestory rises which supports the dome  which is no longer stilted but hemispherical in shape with a metal finial crowned by the crescent symbol.
The interior of the sanctuary is a large hall 208′ X 107′, divided into five aisles by arches on large masonry piers. The nave is a square of 75′ diameter contained within 12 arches. The arches intersect at the top to form an octagonal cornice for supporting the base of. the dome.

Around the nave are the square bays of the aisles, whose ceilings are built on the same principle as the nave, but modified to suit their smaller size. The onion shaped dome of the masjid rests on the beams of a hall, which are divided into 45 compartments.
There is a fountain at the centre, many arches and rooms, a hall and a dome with another 33 domes surrounding it. The masjid also has 12 arches built with 12 interleaving arches and a gateway designed by Aurangzeb. Ornamentation has been kept to a minimum, being of a broad and restrained order and any plastic treatment is of an architectonic nature, more for accentuating a line or space than for embellishment. An incongruous ornament, in the form of a mural design in relief was added at a later date but is confined to the mihrab arch. The twin minarets of Jumma Masjid are decorated with numerous pigeon-holes, and terminate in bulbous  domes above the balconies. Moreover, prayers are still offered, both at the mosque and at the mausoleum.